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Moon

August 24, 2009 by  
Filed under Reviews

Tagline: The last place you’d ever expect to find yourself

Plot: Astronaut Sam Bell (Sam Rockwell) is about to finish a three year stint on the Moon. He works alone supervising the robotic extraction of helium-3 from lunar soil, a compound which has single handily solved the Earth’s energy problems. He only companion is GERTY, his computer, but as the days tick down Sam makes a life changing discovery.

In short: The best film I have seen so far this year

The preamble: My cult and contentious reviews’ system. Designed as a time saver to highlight the potential deal breakers in an offering before you commit to buy or read lengthy reviews on your favourites sites/magazines. For a more detailed description please read: THE RULES

moon sam rockwell movie poster Moon

Moon - Starring: Sam Rockwell; Director: Duncan Jones

 

Just the Bad Points Review: Moon

  • Fans of action flicks will find this heavy going
  • This isn’t about aliens, gun fights or spaceships
  • As it sounds: one man, alone in space, on the moon
  • Not light entertainment
  • An emotional roller coaster ride
  • Don’t see it and you’ll miss out on the best movie of the year so far

July Apollo Tech Journalist UK Rankings

August 13, 2009 by  
Filed under Features & Editorials

Something of a shake-up in the latest tables. I understand Apollo is now counting joint bylines which makes a huge difference for sites and publications aggregating content.

As always, remember these table indicate who are the most prolific UK technology journalists, nothing more.

Previous table links for December, January, February, March, April, May and June.

July Table July Apollo Tech Journalist UK Rankings

Apollo July UK Journalist Rankings

Opera Unite takes home PCs into the cloud

August 10, 2009 by  
Filed under Features & Editorials

Reprinted with permission from my original article featured on the TalkTalk official blog

Accessibility. It is perhaps the main drive behind the first wave of Cloud computing. It’s something that the exciting new Google Chrome OS is keen to promote and a factor which will come to simplify the lives of millions. In short it means having the ability to access your digital content from any web connected computer in any place at any time. Think of the possibilities. Never would you forget that important document or presentation, never would you be caught short without our favourite music, movies, television shows or eBooks. Sure, Cloud Computing hopes to achieve this by storing all our information securely online but its widespread acceptance will be measured in years, not weeks or months. Likewise expe

Accessibility. It is perhaps the main drive behind the first wave of Cloud computing. It’s something that the exciting new Google Chrome OS is keen to promote and a factor which will come to simplify the lives of millions. In short it means having the ability to access your digital content from any web connected computer in any place at any time.

Think of the possibilities. Never would you forget that important document or presentation, never would you be caught short without our favourite music, movies, television shows or eBooks. Sure, Cloud Computing hopes to achieve this by storing all our information securely online but its widespread acceptance will be measured in years, not weeks or months. Likewise expensive web servers can perform much the same task but they require technical expertise and ongoing monthly costs. So what if there was an easier and free way to do all this right now…?

This is what ‘Opera Unite’ looks to do. It is the brainchild of Opera, the innovative software developer behind the browser of the same name. The two minute tutorial video above provides a simple walkthrough of how it works but the fundamental point is you can easily share and remotely access folders on your computer using nothing more than the latest version of the Opera web browser.

To provide user security the content you share can be set with three access levels: public, limited and private and Opera Unite will create a URL and optional password for you that can be passed onto friends, family and colleagues. So what can you share?

On the most basic level documents, music and photos but more advanced users can host websites, chat rooms and even create a secure environment to securely exchange data. And Opera assures us this is only the beginning.

“Today, we are opening the full potential of the Web for everyone,” said Opera CEO Jon von Tetzchner at the launch of the service. “Technology moves in distinct cycles. PCs decentralized computing away from large mainframes. Opera Unite now decentralizes and democratizes the cloud… consumers have the flexibility to choose private and efficient ways of sharing information. We believe Opera Unite is one of our most significant innovations yet, because it changes forever the fundamental fabric of the Web.”

Needless to say this is a big claim but Tetzchner may not be far wrong. Certainly there are limits with the inherent simplicity of Opera Unite – namely the PC hosting the information needs to remain on and the Opera browser must be used – but it does indeed flip around the traditional fabric of the web. After all, in the beginning the internet was solely about consuming the data provided by others, then ‘Web 2.0′ brought social networking and user generated content. Now the consumer friendly approach of Opera Unite could drive a third stage: decentralisation and accessibility.

Or in other words: your data under your control available anyplace, anywhere, anytime.

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