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Audyssey South of Market

April 5, 2012 by  
Filed under Reviews

 

An audacious name for an audacious dock. Superb performance, flexibility and keen pricing make this a real contender.

Price as reviewed £299.95

Overall 9/10

Key Features

  • 200W output with four discrete amplifiers
  • PC compatibility with mic & USB connectivity
  • Bluetooth with A2DP wireless streaming
  • iOS app allows complete sound customisation
  • iPad compatible

In terms of pure bang for your buck the £250 Monitor Audio i-deck 200 offers arguably the best dock audio experience on the market. Following comments on the back of this review, however, another contender was suggested: Audyssey’s colourfully named South of Market. Having now put the dock through its paces it is clear you readers know your stuff.

On the surface, the South of Market dock is an intriguing concept. Unlike traditional docks, Audyssey has designed South of Market (named after a San Francisco neighbourhood) to be a multipurpose product doubling as both a dock and PC/laptop speakers. Given most docks have 3.5mm auxiliary outputs (the NAD Viso 1 excluded) this seems a weak boast, but South of Market also connects directly to a computer’s USB port so docked devices can sync with iTunes. In addition its unusual shape makes it more practical to position alongside a monitor.

This shape is worthy of further discussion. Looking somewhat like a curvy version of theCoolerMaster CM 690 II PC case, it has dimensions of 23 x 28 x 13 cm (H x D x W) making for a narrow, but deep, form factor with a small footprint. At 4.1Kg it is also relatively light, though packs no internal battery or carry handle for easy portability. This is a dock designed to be have a permanent mooring position. On the plus side Audyssey has managed to squeeze the transformer inside the dock meaning there is no leaden power brick on the cable.

Beyond simple differentiation, however, the shape of the Audyssey South of Market dock is fundamental to its audio performance. Taking a leaf from the Arcam rCube, Audyssey has positioned its speakers at opposing angles on each side of the dock to create the widest possible stereo separation.
Separation is a near constant problem for docks. Their small dimensions mean speakers have to sit close together and this is compounded by positioning them in the same direction. In the worst examples this can create a near-mono experience. So does Audyssey’s approach work? More later. Continue reading the full article on TrustedReviews

Copyright for all reviews, editorials and features on this site belong to their respective publishers. All samples published on this website are via prior agreement with those publishers and serve to act as a portfolio and centralised location for all my work. Contact me at gordon@gordonkelly.com should you wish to commission me or supply review samples, press releases or arrange meetings. 

BBC Future – Titanic Anniversary: The Myth of the Unsinkable Ship

April 3, 2012 by  
Filed under Media & Copywriting

 

My debut feature for new BBC Worldwide site BBC Future.

Note: as part of BBC Worldwide, BBC Future is not available to available UK dwellers. You can use this ‘anonymouse’ link to view it.

The official link can be found here:
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20120402-the-myth-of-the-unsinkable-ship

The full article can also be read below, click to enlarge each page. 

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Copyright for all reviews, editorials and features on this site belong to their respective publishers. All samples published on this website are via prior agreement with those publishers and serve to act as a portfolio and centralised location for all my work. Contact me at gordon@gordonkelly.com should you wish to commission me or supply review samples, press releases or arrange meetings. 

The Scotsman – Myths & Miracles of Social Media

April 3, 2012 by  
Filed under Media & Copywriting

 

In the run up to Digital Scotland last month I produced two features for The Scotsman newspaper: ‘Myths and Miracles of Social Media’ and a ‘Smart Devices: Roundup’.

Many thanks to all the contributors involved in this.

Please find an image of the articles from the newspaper below and a PDF can be downloaded here. Questions, comments and further professional enquiries welcome.

Click to Enlarge

 

Copyright for all reviews, editorials and features on this site belong to their respective publishers. All samples published on this website are via prior agreement with those publishers and serve to act as a portfolio and centralised location for all my work. Contact me at gordon@gordonkelly.com should you wish to commission me or supply review samples, press releases or arrange meetings. 

Logitech UE Air AirPlay Dock

April 3, 2012 by  
Filed under Reviews

 

Two newcomers to the world of premium docks combine to teach the sector something new…

Price as reviewed £299.99

Overall 8/10

Key Features

  • 2.0 speaker arrangement
  • AirPlay Wireless Streaming
  • Smart AirPlay setup app
  • Slide out Apple dock connector
  • Slim & lightweight

The Logitech UE Air AirPlay Speaker is a strangely branded item. For a start it carries both the Logitech and Ultimate Ears brands, the latter of which has not made a dock before. Secondly it is being promoted as a speaker when it is actually fitted with an Apple dock connector. None of which matters when forces come together like this…

Design
The first thing to say about the Air is it is clearly a labour of love for both companies. Apart from a few iconic exceptions like the Bowers & Wilkins Zeppelin and Arcam rCube most docks have become variants on a shell/rugby ball theme, but the Air is far more graceful than that. Shaped like a single curved wing, the Air gives the pleasant sense of being familiar but new. If Batman owned a dock, it would be this one.

The Caped Crusader may be tempted to take the Air with him as well since it lives up to its name by weighing just 2.81Kg and measuring only 506 x 152 x 140mm, making it one of the lightest premium docks we’ve tested. Unfortunately he wouldn’t be able to use it on the move since the Air is mains powered only, but it remains easy to shift from room to room in Wayne Manor.
Build quality is good too. An aesthetically pleasing mix of minimal piano black on the top and front slide out dock connector, a matt rear finish (with clear smiley face) to keep away the dust and the dominating material grill covering the front speaker. Those who like to remove their speaker grills should note the Air’s is fixed. That shouldn’t be a deal breaker, however, as working itself further into our affections is the smart dock. Read the rest of this review on TrustedReviews

Copyright for all reviews, editorials and features on this site belong to their respective publishers. All samples published on this website are via prior agreement with those publishers and serve to act as a portfolio and centralised location for all my work. Contact me at gordon@gordonkelly.com should you wish to commission me or supply review samples, press releases or arrange meetings. 

Klipsch Gallery G-17 Air Soundbar

April 3, 2012 by  
Filed under Reviews

 

Klipsch enters the premium AirPlay speaker market, and finds the competition tough.

Price as reviewed £429.00

Overall 5/10

Key Features

  • AirPlay
  • 60W 2.0 speaker system
  • Bass reflex acoustics
  • USB digital & 3.5mm auxiliary inputs
  • Bundled remote control

You want a premium speaker for your iPhone, you want it from a premium brand and you want AirPlay? Step forward Klipsch with nearly 70 years of acclaimed audio history and its £429 Gallery G-17 Air speakers with integrated AirPlay. If only it were that simple…

The Gallery G-17 is Klipsch’s first dalliance into the expensive world of Apple AirPlay systems and it is immediately out to make an impression. How it achieves this is by daring to be different. The G-17 breaks from the usual rounded rugby ball/shell-like designs that swamp the market, with a retro 80s-esque rectangular design atop a detachable stand.

Build materials are an interesting contrast. The speaker itself walks the well worn path of piano black plastics and dares to expose its speakers, a raw look we think more manufacturers should choose. Klipsch does supply a simple material grill, which cleverly attaches with magnets, but one look at Klipsch’s marketing materials will tell you leaving them exposed is its preferred look. In contrast the G-17’s stand is metal, surprisingly heavy and dares to step back into a time when you connected things using screws.

Together speaker and stand weigh just 3.5Kg, and the stand accounts for 800g of that. The Klipsch Gallery G-17 doesn’t have an internal battery so isn’t portable in the strictest sense, but it is light enough to carry from room to room and measures just 43.2cm long, 14.4cm tall and 10.1cm deep (17.78cm tall with the stand) so it is relatively small even if the actual footprint isn’t quite so petite.

In terms of connectivity the G-17 ticks the right boxes. Continue reading the rest of the review on TrustedReviews

 Copyright for all reviews, editorials and features on this site belong to their respective publishers. All samples published on this website are via prior agreement with those publishers and serve to act as a portfolio and centralised location for all my work. Contact me at gordon@gordonkelly.com should you wish to commission me or supply review samples, press releases or arrange meetings. 

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